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Travel Book Reviews - Europe
By Suroor Alikhan 


A Year in the World—Journeys of a Passionate Traveller
by Frances Mayes

“How do place and character intertwine? Could I feel at home here? What is home to those around me? Who are they in their homes, those mysterious others?”

To find out, Frances Mayes (of Under the Tuscan Sun fame) stayed in rented houses rather than hotels. It changes the dynamics of travel: you shop at the market, cook in your kitchen and get to know the neighbours. “The aromas from your kitchen become a territorial marker: I live here.”

In spite of the title of the book, the towns Mayes chooses are mostly in Mediterranean countries and the UK. She and her husband Ed spend part of their year in Tuscany, renovating a house. The idea comes to her at the end of a holiday. Why don’t they keep moving?

So begins the year of travel. They go to Portugal, Andalucia, Italy, Fez, Burgundy, UK (including Scotland), Greece, Crete and Turkey. Like me, Mayes arrives somewhere and imagines what it would be like to live there. She delves into the history, the landscape, the people, and most of all, the food: Mayes is a dedicated foodie. She is often accompanied by the ghosts of long-dead writers from the region, whose books Mayes reads on the journey. They add an extra layer of complexity.

In Naples, a group of musicians inspires a couple to dance a tango on the street. In Fez, Mayes is amazed by the colours in the narrow streets: the women in the djellabas and the spices at the stalls. In Lisbon, a bookshop owner advises Mayes on where and what to eat. And the food: churros con chocolate in Spain, fish fried in “gossamer” batter in Portugal, pizza in Naples (naturally!), couscous with seven vegetables in Fez, and hot toffee sauce and gingerbread in Scotland (recipe included).

Not all the trips are on solid land though. She agrees to a speaking engagement on a cruise ship that sails by Greece. Given that Greece was the inspiration for her travels, I felt she was doing it a disservice by seeing it from what is essentially a floating hotel. The relief when in the next chapter, they go back to being on their own! Turkey is also by boat but with a small group of friends.

Mayes writes lyrically—with a tendency to romanticize. I’d like to end with her description of a Scottish riverside: “The hydrangeas, lining the banks of the languid little river Hiraethlyn, mimicked the flow of water. Blurry, blue reflections doubled the dreaminess. The woods were silent, except for sparkling river sounds. …The late sunlight seemed liquid, a faded watercolour with pastels smearing the sky into the water.”

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The Year of Living Danishly: Uncovering the Secrets of the World’s Happiest Country
by Helen Russell

Helen Russell lived in London, working crazy hours with hardly any time off. When her partner is offered a job at Lego in Jutland, Denmark, they realize that it is going to be a complete change of pace. It’s not just a move to another country but also from a city to the countryside. Russell decides she will spend her time getting to know “the happiest country in the world”.

Happiest country? Really? Russell starts out being sceptical, but almost every Dane she asks rates themselves 8 to 10 out of 10 for happiness. So what is the secret? For one, the pastries are amazing. There is a strong work-life balance—people come home at 4 in the afternoon at the latest, and anyone putting in extra hours is seen as being badly organized.

The taxes are high but the state takes care of its citizens from birth to death, with generous subsidies for school, homes, health and so on. This gives people a safety net and the freedom to live the way they want, which means they take up jobs they enjoy. And because education is free, they can train as often as they want to. Russell gains first-hand experience of the social system when she becomes pregnant and is impressed by the level of care.

But there is a downside, of course. In spite of Denmark being gender equal, there is still a high level of sexual violence, and employers hesitate to hire women of child-bearing age. There is also pressure to conform, tradition being big in Denmark. There are clubs for every kind of activity, so leisure is regimented: each club is assigned a particular day, including the swinging club! People can plan their days for an entire year.

Russell is funny about her attempts to fit in as a rather anarchic person. There are some wonderful moments: while trying to tell her Danish teacher she has seen the TV series The Killing, she inadvertently calls her a bitch (kaelling); she is told off for flying a Union Jack, as the only flag allowed is the Danish one; and her dog shows he sorely needs training to fit into Danish society.

I hadn't expected to enjoy this book as much as I did but Russell’s fondness for Denmark shines through. She made me laugh but also taught me a lot about a country I only knew through the small screen.

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The Politics of Washing: Real Life in Venice
by Polly Coles

If you have ever wondered what it would be like to live in Venice, this book is for you. I read it on a trip to Venice, and it gave me a completely different perspective on the city.

Polly Coles moves to Venice from an English village with her Italian partner Alberto, a violin maker, and their four children. Living in Venice is unlike living anywhere else: there are no cars, and transport involves either a boat or, for the most part, your two legs. The city tends to flood if the tide is very high. And then there is the seemingly impenetrable bureaucracy.

However, in some ways, this is an older, more connected way of life. You cannot escape into the bubble of a car: you have to engage with the people you come across. There are no huge, impersonal supermarkets: the butcher and grocer not only know their products but also get to know their customers and their needs. When Coles buys an avocado, the grocer finds her one that would be ripe exactly at the right time.

Coles settles in and obviously loves Venice and its people. The city is a wonderful mix of the old and the new. “Here, in Alberto’s workshop, an antique craft was being pursued, but…the musicians who came in for repairs or to buy a new instrument were, of course, as modern as anybody anywhere. This was Venice at its best: a place of artisanal excellence, keeping alive ancient traditions and techniques for the modern world.”

She also writes with great empathy about immigrants. She hears the stories of women from Moldova, who have left their families to earn money to send back home. She writes about the African and Indonesian street vendors who manage to keep a safe distance from the law.

I enjoyed her observations, her sense of humour and her worry about how far she should hang the washing on the line that runs between two apartments. (She decides on the halfway point so that the lady in the apartment opposite isn’t subjected to the indignity of sipping her morning coffee on her balcony with someone else’s boxer shorts flapping over her head.) The book is full of vignettes that build a picture of the real Venice.

But most of all, this book is a cri de coeur for the preservation of Venice as a living community, rather than as a romantic backdrop for the millions of tourists who have no real investment in the city. Shops that serve the community, like butchers and bakers, are being replaced by cheap souvenir shops, and Venetians are being pushed out of the city by the rising rents as landlords would rather rent apartments to tourists by the week. The result is that the kind of community that keeps a place alive is disappearing. And that is slowly killing this wonderful, unique city.

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Forward: Letters Written on a Trip around the World
by Lina Boegli

Alone in Cracow (in what was then Austria) and bored and lonely, Swiss pioneer traveller Lina Boegli decided to see if a woman could work her way around the world. Her journey began in 1892 and lasted 10 years. This book is a collection of her letters to her best friend, Elizabeth.

Friends were appalled at the idea but their warnings about rape, shipwreck, slave traders and murder only made her more determined. She had enough money to book a passage to Australia. As for the rest, she had a teacher’s certificate and could teach French or German or work as a housemaid. Boegli’s trip would eventually take her to Australia, New Zealand, Samoa, Hawaii (which was on the brink of being annexed to the United States) and the US. 

Boegli is a observant and adventurous traveller with an unshakeable faith in people. She also has a dry sense of humour, which I enjoyed. In West Maitland, New South Wales, a lady warned her about murderous cab drivers. She disagreed: the cab driver who had driven her was charming. When she saw him again, “It was almost like meeting an old friend; after the stories of my hostess, I am so much obliged to him for not having murdered me.” 

In many ways, she was progressive—she believed in women being able to vote. When she heard about the theosopher Annie Besant who had the clergy up in arms, her reaction was, “She must be interesting if she is so dangerous”. Theosophists believe in reincarnation, a concept that intrigued her. She also thought of another trip around the world: how would she travel, by balloon or electricity? Like other Europeans of her time, she saw white people as generally superior, although she did admire the Maoris, as well as the Samoans for their focus on education. Her prejudice was one element that jarred in the book.

I would recommend reading Forward—it is an interesting historical look at what the conditions were like for single women in the late 1800s, and it is heartening to know that, even over a century ago, women were adventurous enough to take a leap into the unknown.

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Writing on the Road - book review

Writing on the Road: Campervan Love and the Joy of Solitude
by Sue Reid Sexton

If you’ve ever dreamed of buying a campervan and disappearing into the wilderness, this book is for you. It has everything you ever wanted to know about them and then some: buying the right one, dealing with waste (and the pros and cons of a Porta Potti) and DIY.

But this is not a manual. Sexton is a writer who works best in her campervan in the wild: in her case, the western Scottish highlands. Scotland has some of the most stunning landscapes I’ve seen, and her descriptions made me realize how much more there is to explore - places like Assynt, with rocks three thousand million years old and a rich variety of wildlife.

Sexton also takes you on her personal journey as she deals with the breakup of a long relationship. But the real love affair is with campervans. She has had four over the years, each with a name and personality. Vera, “a wee old lady of a van” with a 10-year-old engine under the seats, overheats passengers and melts cheese. Vera gave way to Vanessa Hotplate, who could be a little unstable. Sexton found out just how unstable when she tried to drive down an open road with strong gusts of wind. It took all her skills as a driver not to be blown across the road into the path of approaching trucks.

Interspersed with lyrical descriptions of nature are some hilarious moments. During a perfect evening by the sea southwest of Kintyre, she watches the sunset, “the pinks and oranges…burning a reflected path across the water to my door”. A seal emerges and blows bubbles at her. She settles in for the night, when a windowless van pulls up, full of men. A voice very close to her window asks if someone has brought a knife. She locks her door as quietly as she can and waits for the worst. There was the “sound of something heavy, like a suitcase full of body parts, landing on the ground”. Fortunately, the men, who were probably surfers, soon go to sleep, and she wakes up unharmed.

I wasn’t quite sure what to expect from this book and was pleasantly surprised at how multi-faceted it was. Sexton is funny, thoughtful and honest about her fears. Read this book even if you’re not planning to head to the hills in your mobile home: it will remind you of the joys of being alone, facing down your fears and being close to nature.

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A Chorus of Cockerels: Walking on the Wild Side in Mallorca
by Anne Nichols

If there is a thread running through this book, it’s chickens. Chickens who behave like domestic pets or  behave like attack dogs, and rescued battery hens who wander around in little knitted pullovers or leather capes.

Nichols used to live in London and ran a public relations consultancy for luxury retail and travel. Fed up of the stressful big city life, she moved her husband and teenage son to rural Mallorca, Spain, in the mid-2000s. They live among chickens, a dog, cat, donkey and other animals. And Nichol’s buddy, Jack, a toad who visits the pond when the weather warms up and with whom Nichols has long conversations.  

Then there are the chickens. Cordelia, who follows her around everywhere and is fascinated by her sneakers because she thinks the laces are worms; and Ferdinand, an old cockerel who has a tendency to attack strangers (including a Jehovah’s Witness whom Nichols found halfway up a tree, clutching a Bible to his chest).

Nichols writes about Mallorca with a lot of affection, both the place and the people. When Jorge, the postman, delivers the mail, he waits until she opens her parcels, out of curiosity. Catalina, who is her housekeeper, is also a friend with strong opinions on how things should be done. When her neighbour, Fernando, has a problem with snails, Nichol’s husband suggests that he use beer to get rid of them. Fernando tells his mother, and finds her in the kitchen, plying the snails with beer from a bowl.

But Nichols still consults as a PR person, and there is a huge contrast between rural Mallorca and ritzy London. Some of the funniest moments in this book have to do with her clients, who range from eccentric to this side of crazy.

The star of this part of the story is definitely Henrietta, an aristocrat who saves battery chickens, who are treated so badly that they lose their feathers. So she, with a little help from like-minded people, knits them little sweaters until their feathers grow back. Henrietta, like Nichols, has names for every single hen she’s rescued and introduces visitors to all of them. 

I loved her descriptions of the animals and the people she meets. My gripe was that she inserts dialogue where it isn’t really needed—for example, when describing a place, which sometimes felt stilted. But there are enough laugh-out-loud moments in the book to make it worthwhile. And she captures what it is like to live in a friendly, rural community in Spain. 

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Tracking across Switzerland
by Diana Nial

Diana Nial worked for the Swiss Dining Car Company, which provided meals for the Swiss railways, for six years from the late 1980s to the early 1990s. Nial came to Switzerland from the UK to work for the United Nations but got fed up with being stuck behind a desk. She took a chance on the railways. This book is a mix of anecdotes from her work and her trips, with a few recipes thrown in for good measure.

Nial’s account of her work is the most interesting part of the book. The dining car was often so short-staffed during holidays she was sometimes on her own. She prepared the meals, served them, cleared up and handled the bar. When she started, meals were prepared in the trains' tiny kitchens. By the time she left, meals were served pre-prepared, as on planes.

She meets some interesting characters. Benny is a regular passenger who helps her out by manning the bar. She overhears him make feeding arrangements for his snakes, and finds out later about his job at the serum department of the University of Zurich. 

I didn’t think the sightseeing tips added much to the book, although some of the facts were interesting—I hadn’t realized that Switzerland had 1,484 lakes and 140 glaciers! And I enjoyed her description of the transport museum in Lucerne, with old railway coaches, some dating back to the 1870s. She is obviously passionate about trains and communicates that passion.

The book is the sequel to Swiss Meals on Wheels, a more detailed account of Nial’s experiences on the train. After the book was published, readers wrote to her, suggesting she write about the food served in the dining cars and the places she visited. This explains the recipes, which sound delicious, even when they sometimes seem randomly placed. What I enjoyed most were her portraits of the individuals she met and worked with on the trains.

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Calabria: The Other Italy
by Karen Haid

Calabria is the toe in the boot of Italy. It’s the region that non-Calabrese Italians tend to look down on as crime-ridden and backward, something I found out for myself. When I told my Italian colleague that I was reading about Calabria, his reaction was “Why?” Karen Haid sets out to counter this attitude and prove that Calabria has a lot of offer. She succeeds in doing both.

Haid is an American who speaks Italian and decided to settle there and teach English to support herself. As a non-EU citizen, she ran up against Italy's wall of bureaucracy when trying to get a work permit. On the verge of giving up, she received - and accepted - an offer from a school in Locri, Calabria.

Haid spent her time in Calabria exploring the region. Her descriptions of everyday life are interwoven with the region’s rich history, and both often overlap. Calabria was settled by the ancient Greeks in the 7th and 8th centuries BC. The region of Regio Calabri still has a strong Greek heritage, with road signs in Italian and Greek. In Guardia Piemontese, settled by the Waldensians (adherents of a French protestant movement) in the 13th and early 14th centuries, road signs are in Italian and the native Occitan language, which sounds a lot like French. For example, the Italian terme (spas) translates as banh chaut, which in French would be bains chauds (hot baths). The mythological Scylla and Charybdis mentioned in Homer’s Odyssey could well be a series of sharp rocks and vortexes between Calabria and Sicily.

To my delight, Haid is also a foodie and samples many of Calabria’s regional specialities: pecorino cheese; capicollo, a cold cut made from a pig’s neck; and sopressatta, a spicy, lightly smoked salami. The region is also home to the bergamot and a sweet, mildly flavoured red or purple onion, first grown in the municipality of Tropea by the Phoenicians.

And of course, there are the people: outspoken, unfailingly hospitable and proud of their region. Among these are Luisa, the president of Reggio’s Anglo-Italian Club, with whom Haid goes on several trips; and Maria, the woman she meets at the Terme Luigiani, who regales her with jokes in the Calabrian dialect.

This book doesn't gloss over Calabria. Crime is very real here: the mafia is known as the ‘Ndrangheta and has a long arm. But that's no reason to stay away. When I started reading this book, all I knew about Calabria was pizza calabrese. Now it's on my list of places to visit!

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The Summer Book by Tove Jansson

The Summer Book
by Tove Jansson

Tove Jansson is a Finnish writer best known for her children’s books about the Moomins. This is one of her few books for adults—a gentle, meditative book about the summers a little girl, Sophia, spends with her grandmother on a tiny, deserted island in the Gulf of Finland. It is fiction, but it doesn’t really feel like fiction. Jansson and her partner spent their summers on an island like the one she describes in the book, and the character Sophia was based on her niece. What this book does with gripping effectiveness is capture life on one of these Finnish islands, known for their many summer houses.

The book, written in 1972, paints a picture of what we would today call a summer of disconnect, of living in the moment—a time before cell phones and computers, before we were wired to react all the time to everything. “No-one came to visit and there was no mail. An orchid bloomed.”

The book begins as Sophia’s grandmother searches for her false teeth among the vegetation in front of their little house. It has rained all night and the “bare granite steamed, the moss and crevices were drenched with moisture, and all the colors everywhere had deepened”. Sophia’s mother is dead but the book is haunted by her absence. Her father is there but the book is really about the old woman and the little girl. And the island, which is a personality in its own right.

What struck me most is the protagonists’ seamless connection with the natural world, reflected in slow, rhythmic sentences and vivid descriptions. The family walks along paths in the “magic forest”.

“Only farmers and summer guests walk on the moss.” Moss is frail and if you step on it three times, it dies.

When I finished reading the book, I felt I had actually visited, experiencing the “warm, dark silence” of a Finnish summer night and listening to the “steady, chiding chatter” of long-tailed ducks. This book is still, a respite from a shrill, constantly changing world.

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A Slow Train to Switzerland
by Diccon Bewes

While researching a book on a Switzerland, Diccon Bewes—a Briton who has lived in Switzerland for over eight years—found a reference to a diary written by an English woman, Jemimah Morrell (known as Miss Jemima) who traveled with Thomas Cook’s First Conducted Tour of Switzerland in 1863. He was intrigued.

Found in the post-war rubble in London’s East End, safe in a tin box, the diaries were published as Miss Jemima’s Swiss Journals, and then forgotten. Bewes managed to obtain a copy of the 100th anniversary edition. The diaries were a time machine, taking him 150 years into the past of a country he knew well. Accompanied by his mother and Miss Jemima’s ghost, he decided to retrace her footsteps, sticking as close as possible to her mode of travel. He would see for himself how much, or little, Switzerland had changed in the last century and a half.

In some ways, the Switzerland Miss Jemima visited was dramatically different from the country today. It was poorer; most people lived off the land and certainly could not afford leisure travel. The Swiss railway routes were limited and service was nowhere near as efficient and extensive it is now. Swiss tourism was in its infancy, and neither Heidi nor milk chocolate existed. But some things have not changed: visitors then, as now, complained about the high prices!

The Swiss journey Thomas Cook organized in 1863 was an attempt to persuade ordinary British people to explore the continent, until then a prerogative of the rich. The birth of middle-class tourism driven by a growing railway network helped make Switzerland wealthy.

Miss Jemima’s group of seven, who called themselves Young United Alpine Club, included four women and three men, including her brother William. These intrepid Victorians travelled by train, carriage, ferry and often on foot, walking for miles and making modern-day travellers look pampered. Their schedule was gruelling: Usually up at 5 am, travelling all day, rushing to briefly explore their destination before bedtime and off again the next day. Neither trains nor carriages had bathrooms, and  I have special admiration for the women, clambering up narrow paths carved out on mountains in long dresses and corsets—paths that I would find difficult in trousers and good boots.

The book is full of interesting facts. In 1863, Geneva time was five minutes behind Bern but 15 minutes ahead of Paris. This made it challenging for trains to run on time, so Swiss time zones were standardized in 1894.

Bewes reveals many links between Britain and Switzerland: Thomas Cook’s tours started the tourist invasion of the country, English engineers were called to help set up the Swiss railways and—believe it or not—the British invented skiing (on wooden skis)!

I loved the alternating perspectives on Switzerland—Diccon Bewes’s and Ms. Jemimah’s, whose observant and at times mischievous voice often dominated. She describes a downhill descent on a mountain path: “rugged with loose stones which threaten to make mincemeat of our shoe soles. Even the mules are…discarded…. In fact, one mule discarded its rider… to give the animal his due, there was some display of oriental grace in the camel-like kneel with which he preceded his nonchalant roll across the path.”

I have lived in Switzerland for almost 30 years and know a lot of the places Bewes describes – but I hadn’t seen them through these eyes. I will now take this book—and its two knowledgeable guides—with me when I travel in the country. And I would invite you to do the same. 

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Victoria’s Travel TipZ Italian Style:
Simple Ways to Enjoy Italian Ways on Your Next Trip to Italy

by Victoria De Maio 

This handy little book, slim enough to slip into your handbag, is not a guide book in the traditional sense but a list of do’s and don’ts aimed mainly at Americans travelling in Italy, possibly for the first time. 

Victoria De Maio is an American with Italian grandparents who obviously loves Italy, and this love comes through her writing. Clearly she wants you to love it too. 

The book starts, appropriately enough, with food, which is serious business in Italy. You sit down to eat, take your time and enjoy the food. In fact, “take your time” is a mantra that flows throughout the book: don’t rush, go with the flow, don’t feel you have to see everything but take in what you do see. Take the time to explore tiny side streets because sightseeing isn’t only about historical monuments but about getting the feel of a place, appreciating the multitude of ways it is unlike your home. Yet that doesn’t mean you avoid something just because it is touristy—after all, you are a tourist, aren't you?

There is plenty of advice in this book about the best way to see tourist sites (don't drive!), money, how to pick a place to stay, conversions (Centigrade anyone?), and so much more. Her advice on safety is sensible: there are pickpockets but they do not lurk in every corner, so take precautions, as you would in most places, but don’t get so obsessed with safety that you don’t enjoy yourself.

Each chapter begins with a proverb in Italian (translated into English). Many are familiar and exist in English, so this helps jumpstart an understanding of the language. The brief glossary of basic Italian words at the back of the book was also helpful.

One thing worth noting is a bonus section that contains advice from people—bloggers, tour guides and others—who were asked for a single tip they would give visitors to Italy.

My favourite: “Don’t stint on the gelato”!

Rather than tell you what to see and where to go, De Maio tries to give you a sense of the culture and the people, showing you how to get the best from your trip, all dispensed with a healthy dose of humour. This book will be the delight of first-timers to Italy but repeat visitors will also have plenty to discover within its pages.

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Narrow Dog to Carcassonne
by Terry Darlington

“We could bore ourselves to death, drink ourselves to death, or have a bit of an adventure.”

And so a retired couple, Terry and Monica Darlington, take their whippet, Jim, and their narrow boat, meant for canals, across the Channel into France. This the first time I’ve reviewed a travel book whose star is the family pet: the thieving, pubs- and chips-loving whippet, Jim (the “narrow dog” of the title). He is a reluctant sailor, though—he hates it when the ground shifts under his feet, so moving boats are things he could do without. But since he doesn’t really have much choice, he puts up with his humans’ eccentricities, and even manages to summon enough sangfroid to comfort Monica when she is convinced the boat will capsize.

And it does sometimes come close to capsizing. Especially as Terry and Monica are not expert sailors. Narrow boats are long and perfect for sailing down inland canals, but completely unsuitable for crossing a large body of water.

The book starts in the canals in Britain, then the momentous crossing of the Channel, battling six-foot waves (they’re helped by an expert, The Principal) and then through French and Belgian canals. Sailing through canals exposes parts of cities most people don’t see, and they meet people you wouldn’t normally meet as a regular tourist—sea captains, the occasional drunks and gongoozlers (landlubbers who are fascinated with boats). I learned a lot about locks (which help raise and lower boats between canals with different water levels) and lock keepers. Jim is a big attraction—everyone they meet along the route is taken up with “les anglais et leur petit lévrier”.

Through all this sailing, Jim is irrepressible. They can’t even take him to the vet without him dividing up the patients in the waiting room “into those he could chase, those he could impregnate and those he could eat”. Tied to a café table in Paris, he tries to strangle himself, drag away the table, look for scraps and any chance for sex. At one point, Monica decides Jim should earn his keep and catch rabbits for their dinner. So Terry and Jim go hunting. Except that the rabbits are savvy enough to know that this is no hunting dog, and calmly step back into the hedges when they see Jim charging, stepping back out once he had gone.

A laugh-out-loud book - as long as you can cope with the absence of inverted commas around quotes.

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Italy: 100 Locals Tell You Where To Go, What To Eat & How To Fit In
by Gigi Griffis

If your way of travelling is to rush through places, ticking them off your list, then this book is not for you. If, however, you want to really get to know a place and its people, then this is perfect. And what better way to get to know a place than getting advice from the locals? Which is exactly what Gigi Griffis’s guide to Italy is.

The book is divided into two sections. The first is a series of brief guides to the country for foodies, wine lovers, outdoor people and history buffs from chefs, wine experts, a base jumper, hiker, cyclist and a professor of Italian history.

The second section divides the country by region. Griffis selects a few cities from each one and interviews the locals—both Italians and expats living there. She selects not only cities but also small towns and villages. Each interview is presented separately: what there is to see, what tourists should eat and where, what they should do (or not do) to fit in, where you can meet people and much more. The answers make for a fascinating read.

One of the absolute no-nos—it comes up several times—is to order a cappuccino after (or heaven forbid, during) dinner. Wearing flip-flops anywhere except the beach is another. And of course, ketchup on pizza or pasta.

Much of the book is about food—the local specialities: sardines in onion sauce in Venice, risotto alla Milanese in Milan, spaghetti con le vongole in Naples… I could go on. And of course, the gelato! I firmly believe that the Italian gelato is the best ice-cream in the world, especially artisanal gelato. An American expat in Venice says you can tell artisanal gelato by the colour of banana (greyish-white), mint (white) and pistachio (greyish-green) gelatos, because they use real ingredients rather than commercial flavouring and colouring.

It’s not just about food, of course. There is so much to see in Italy. The advice from people in Rome was, yes, do see the famous monuments, but when you’re done with them, head off the beaten track. The book also suggests how to meet local people—mostly in bars! (Don’t think about getting drunk there, though—Italians start drinking at an early age, so they can hold their drink and do not look kindly on drunks.)

The people interviewed seem to love where they live, and so they make the best guides. This is such a great idea! Hats off to Griffis for thinking of it. It would be wonderful to start a series of guides like this, so we could become part of the lives of the places we visit, even if it’s for a short time.

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A Fine Romance: Falling in Love with the English Countryside
by Susan Branch  

Susan Branch and her husband Joe always wanted to go back to England, which they both love and hadn’t been back to since 2004. So in 2012, when Susan turned 65, they booked themselves on the Queen Mary 2 and went on a two-month ramble through the castles and cottages of rural England. This is their diary.

The book is beautifully produced, with over 300 photos and watercolours—Susan is also a painter. But what is striking about it is that the book is handwritten. (I’m a bit of a font nerd so I looked closely at the letters to make sure.) It’s a day by day account—a real diary—so there is a lot of detail. And mouthwatering recipes scattered throughout. What I found amazing was that they travelled with 12 bags, which made me feel like a light traveller! They packed everything, including an electric kettle, mugs and tea.

I had mixed feelings about this book. On the one hand, there is a lot of useful information on travelling in England. The Branches rented apartments but sometimes stayed in bed and breakfasts. These are described in detail, as are the National Trust houses they visit. On the other hand, there was nothing of the multicultural, multiethnic country that the UK has become. Apart from a few modern things like a GPS in the car, computers and printers, you could be in 1950s England. In that sense, it is fairly narrow view of the country. And there are annoying references to “the adorable English” and their “cute” way of speaking.

But, as I mentioned earlier, there are a lot of handy tips for the traveller. And if you’re an American visiting the UK for the first time, this is definitely worth reading. Susan translates a lot of “English” terms into “American”. There are also lists of recommended books and movies about England. And details of how to get to places and where to stay. I know that if I planned a trip like this, I would use this book.

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Driving Over Lemons: An Optimist in Andalucia
by Chris Stewart

This is a charming account of an English couple who buy an old, remote farm in Las Alpujarras in the Sierra Nevada foothills of Andalucia. Chris, a former Genesis drummer, doesn’t pretend that living here is easy. The farm, El Valero, is run-down and takes years to fix. There is no electricity, access road, or running water (the farm’s on the wrong side of the river). The chickens and quails are eaten by stoats and weasels (“Unfortunately, as I was eating the egg, a stoat or a weasel was eating the chickens”), and the vegetable patch is raided by sheep, who eat everything except the chillies and aubergines. But there are olives, almonds and oranges, and lemons are so abundant that there is no way to avoid driving over the “fallen yellow orbs”.

But while Chris can get a little romantic about the farm and his neighbours, his wife, Ana, puts things into perspective. She is a no-nonsense woman, who does not suffer fools—or the annual of slaughtering pigs—gladly. She isn’t taken in by the “helpfulness” of Pedro, from whom they buy the farm, and is eventually proved right.

What attracted me about this book is the fact that neither Chris nor Ana had any experience of farming. But through sheer determination, they made a go of it. It made me feel like I could do it too—give it all up and move to Andalucia. To be able to go out on a sultry summer night with a full moon for a swim in a little pool and see the shepherd next door going past with his sheep. To see the orange blossoms in the spring: “exquisite white five-petalled stars” with a “delicate and heady” scent that lasts for months. And to become part of a community that goes back to a simpler way of living in tune with nature—a world away from our hyperactive, hyper-connected lives.

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