Temple Square

by Jenny
(Columbus OH, USA)

The Salt Lake City, UT Latter Day Saints temple is a truly impressive site. It is a beautiful gray granite structure with lots of religious symbolism in the architecture and six towering spires that point toward the sky.

Learn about the history of how and when the temple was actually built and you will be amazed at the physical building itself. It is so majestic and has stood for hundreds of years, although it was built by poor, unskilled members of the 1800s church with next to no technology. They did this because of their great faith in the work that they were doing.

The temple is the center of the area known as Temple Square. Temple Square is a beautifully-landscaped pavilion comprising various other significant buildings to the LDS faith, a theater that shows a featured religious movie, and two visitors' centers filled with information about the religion and the temple.

Though you have to be a worthy adult member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to enter the inside of the temple, the sight of the temple exterior is just breathtaking and Temple Square is definitely worth seeing. I liked visiting the grounds because of the peace and beauty all around me. There is a flowing fountain and several statues all around the square, plus everything is so green and alive in the spring and summer. I have been to Temple Square a few times.

At Christmastime, Temple Square is decked out with millions of Christmas lights. It takes months to assemble it all. Every branch on every tree in the whole area is individually wrapped with strings of colored lights. Combined with the majesty of the temple, it is a truly neat sight to see.

Click here to post comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Sacred Places.

Brides Church in London

by Doris
(Wisconsin, USA)

This is one of the most amazing historical sites (and sights) I can think of. It is missed by many people who visit London, and the price is merely a donation to the church. My friend and I contributed the equivalent of about $10 dollars each. Well worth it.

It is an ornate small church, and just the appearance is interesting from the outside.

But the amazing things are the hundreds of years of history dating from early Roman times that is UNDER the church. There are stone pews and a pulpit carved from marble and so much more. Also, there were long rows of skeletons piled high on the side--you were not allowed to enter that area, but you could look.

The Catholic Sister who was our guide said that it was not known whether these people had died as a result of war or one of the major plagues. She said they were still working on trying to find out.

Brides church is also easy to get to from central London (assuming you have good walking shoes).

The best places and sights often are not known to travel agents, or travel agents do not profit from knowing about them. We learned about this church from two nice elderly ladies who saw us trying to figure out a bus schedule.

Click here to post comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Sacred Places.

The Grotto at the University of Notre Dame

The University of Notre Dame is located in the northwest portion of Indiana, United States. A few years ago my family was driving from Chicago to the east coast and we decided to stop at the university to see the campus and some of the famous landmarks there. Right down a hill from the church and looking out on a lake is the grotto, which is carved into the side of a hill, outlined in rocks and filled with burning candles.

It is a very spiritual place and many people, from students to visitors, stop there to say a prayer, light a candle, or just sit on the nearby benches and enjoy the beauty of the site.

It is somewhat hard to describe the feeling that we got being there at the grotto, but it is very powerful and memorable and I really felt a connection to G-d and my faith during the short time that we spent at that location. It is beautiful and I strongly recommend that everyone visit, even if you are not Catholic or religious. It is worth the trip just to have the experience.

Click here to post comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Sacred Places.

Machu Picchu in Peru

by Sharon
(US)

You feel something special when you are there, something I can not explain. Starting from the location of the fortress, the magnificent of the landscape, and then the history that it has.
I can not wait to visit the "sister" sacred city also in Cusco, named Choquequirao. Since I am not the adventure traveler type, I need to wait for the neccessary infraestructure to get there...

Click here to post comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Sacred Places.

Scala Sancta

by Laura
(New York City NY)

Near the cathedral of St. John in Lateran in Rome are the Scala Sancta or sacred steps. These marble steps have been transported from Jerusalem - they were the steps leading to Pilate's praetorum and are said to be the steps Christ climbed when he was sentenced. Every day the steps are filled with the devout who climb them on hands and knees. They are located in their own private chapel. It's a set of 28 steps flanked on each side by other sets of stairs. I went there because I was intrigued to see how the public would regard such a chapel.

It's quite an unusual sacred site. It's fascinating to see people climbing the stairs and having such an intense experience through physical contact with the marble. The visitors are essentially re-playing and re-enacting the concept of Christ's Passion.

Click here to post comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Sacred Places.

Our Lady of Consolation Shrine Carey, Ohio

by Tamara
(Avon Ohio US)

We had many times driven past Our Lady of Consolation Shrine, and talked about stopping. We weren’t Catholic, just curious. We drove through Carey, Ohio often, and one day decided that we would just stop and see what exactly the shrine looked like.

The statue of the Virgin Mary was a replica of her as the Consoler of the Afflicted, and was the first such shrine in the United States, built in 1875. Many people have reported favors and small miracles after having visited the shrine. The original church where the statue was held is a small white frame building, located across the street and just down the road from the newer basilica. The basilica is filled with ornate stained glass windows, depictions of various holy scenes, and is fairly large.

While we were there, tours were being given, but we just went in and sat quietly for a few moments admiring the architecture.

Click here to read or post comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Sacred Places.

Santiago de Compostella, Spain

by Agnes
(Lithuania)

I went to Santiago de Compostella in Spain when I was still a teenager. It was a weird visit – during holidays with my parents, with the general situation really uncomfortable to me. What’s more, we drove there instead of walking or cycling at least some part of the way, and in spite of that the family would constantly talk about how this was a selfless pilgrimage etc, which sounded like a total hypocrisy.

Finally, I was not even a believer then – a pretty typical teenage crisis for someone brought up with a really religious background.

Still, I found the place mesmerizing – with all the people who have, apparently, come from all different places in the world. The heart of my experience was a visit to the basilica – but not really the famous sculpture nor even the enormous thurible (though seeing it swing back and forth through the nave is breathtaking). Those people were the ones that caught most of my attention, and how they were praying.

For some minutes I almost wished I could pray myself, that I could be more like them.

I still remember this moment dearly though years have passed and now looking in the past I think it might have been a symbolic beginning of my spiritual renewal. I hope that one day I will be able to return there – this time on a more typical kind of a pilgrimage – and thank for the first experience.

Click here to post comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Sacred Places.

Karnak Temple Complex

Karnak is the largest ancient religious site in the world, located near Luxor (which was known as Thebes in ancient Egypt and is considered nowadays a vast open-air museum).

Karnak’s entrance is called the first pylon. After it the visitors can see a 45-foot tall statue of Ramses II standing alongside the entryway of the second pylon. Next to the second pylon there’s one of ancient Egypt’s greatest constructions: the great colonnaded hall, which contains 134 columns, some of them are more than 70 feet high. The columns were once topped by a roof, of which some parts remain. The area to the southwest contains the "Sacred Lake".

After more than 20 years, I can still remember the impressive "sound and light Show" I watched there. It has a historical introduction about the ancient city of Thebes and a description of the artistic treasures in Karnak temple.

Click here to post comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Sacred Places.

The MacMillan Cross

by Joseph Murphy McMillan
(Oak Island, NC, USA)

The MacMillan Cross

The MacMillan Cross

While visiting Scotland about a year ago, I and my family, the MacMillans, decided to go to Castle Sween which was once held by our clan and has a tower called MacMillan's tower. It was quite a scary looking place as it was in ruins on a craggy hillside by a Loch. While there we were informed of an ancient cross erected by our ancestors that could be found down the road a bit. So, we quickly went there and saw this awesome Celtic cross decorated in the brilliantly intricate Celtic style. The cross is protected by a small stone building and is reputed to be the oldest Celtic cross in Scotland. Hence, the site is considered sacred to the Highlanders of the area. It is definitely worth seeing and there are other ancient crosses to be found there as well. They are all wonderfully carved.

Click here to post comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Sacred Places.

Ankgor Wat, Cambodia near the town of Siem Reap

by Marlene Wildeman
(Kamloops, BC)

Angkor Wat is an approximately 36 square acre piece of land with the ruins of temples just barely protected. I spent a week travelling to and through assorted temples, returning to the town at night to eat and sleep. I found the atmosphere profoundly spiritual; I felt something i have never felt before and it was grand. For me, it had no direct relevance to a god or gods an certainly not to any 'organized' religion. Whatever that was, I am grateful to have experienced it once in my life. However, when I tried to keep it alive back in Canada, I was unsuccessful. It remains a mystery to me. Books have been written describing it as the most spiritual place on Earth.

Click here to post comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Sacred Places.

Machu Picchu

by Donna Richardson
(Mississauga, ON, Canada)

Magical

Magical

Magical Felt like you were falling off the mountain I made it!

I had hurt my knee and was so concerned I wouldn't be able to climb. The wind blew in my face as if the ghosts of Inca's past where breathing inspiration into me. I eventually made it to the top and the clouds opened where I was overcome with the beauty and magnificence of what had been created. It is difficult to imagine how the Inca's built this amazing settlement.Tears rolled down my cheek as this had been a dream of mine. Reaching the top in my condition and having my dream come true added to the magic of the experience.

The tourists have increased over the years, and it is a shameful that many don't respect the beauty. I don't think they should allow anyone up in poor weather as it destroys the terraces.

I loved the llamas and alpacas who lounged around and I even had one sneak up on me and poke me in the back. I'm not sure who was more startled. lol

It was a terrific experience.

Click here to post comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Sacred Places.

Get my list of 9 indispensable items I NEVER travel without!

Sign up for solo travel information and advice - for women just like you, the first Tuesday of every month  >>>>>>